Tag archive for "overseas Filipino workers"

RP SUFFERS FROM BRAIN DRAIN AS BEST WORKERS GO ABROAD

Migration

RP SUFFERS FROM BRAIN DRAIN AS BEST WORKERS GO ABROAD

No Comments 05 August 2010

The Philippines is suffering a crippling brain drain with many of its most talented and qualified workers heading overseas for higher-paid jobs and better lifestyles, employers say.

The shock resignations last week of 25 Philippine Airlines pilots, who left for bigger salaries abroad, highlighted a trend that is changing the stereotype of overseas Filipinos being simply maids, sailors and laborers.

Scientists, engineers, doctors, IT specialists, accountants and even teachers are among the English-speaking talent heading to foreign lands, leaving the government and private companies scrambling to find replacements.

“There is a skills haemorrhage. We are losing workers in the highly professional and skilled categories,” Vicente Leogardo, director-general of the Employers’ Confederation of the Philippines, told Agence France-Presse.

The pilots who quit for jobs in the Middle East and elsewhere in Asia would have in some cases nearly tripled their salaries, Airline Pilots Association of the Philippines president Elmer Pena told AFP.

“The salary here is a lot smaller than in other countries. You can’t really compare it,” he said.

Civil engineer Paris Chuchana joined the exodus two years ago when he moved his family to Singapore so he could take a job earning about US$1,600 a month, five times more than the maximum salary he could expect at home.

Like many expatriates, Chuchana enjoys the lifestyle outside his homeland, which suffers from pervasive corruption, poor infrastructure and frequent natural disasters.

“I was just on vacation, visiting my aunt here, but I found I liked it, so I resigned from my job in the Philippines and came over,” Chuchana told AFP by telephone from Singapore, adding he had no intention of returning home soon.

“My first kid is entering high school so I am already preparing for college.”

The nine million Filipinos who work overseas—about one tenth of the nation’s population—in both high and low-skilled sectors undoubtedly play a crucial role in propping up the nation’s spluttering economy.

Last year they sent home $17.3 billion to relatives or for investment, making up more than 10 percent of the nation’s gross domestic product, according to government data.

But Philippine Airlines’ recent woes have highlighted the costs.

The carrier said its hopes for turning a profit this financial year had sky-dived because the pilot walk-out had forced some flights to be cancelled.

Other organizations recently reported similar brain-drain pain.

The government weather station was heavily criticized last month after it failed to predict the full force of Typhoon Basyang (international codename: Conson) that killed dozens of people.

In its appeal for understanding, it said it did not have enough qualified meteorologists because 24 staff had gone abroad for better-paying jobs in recent years.

And just this week, the environment department announced it had lost 83 geologists to overseas work over the past three years, hampering government programs for mapping earthquake threats and mineral resources.

A Department of Labor study in 2008 found that despite a huge domestic workforce, many positions for skilled workers were going unfilled because there were not enough qualified applicants.

Amid this shortfall, 22 percent of the roughly 330,000 Filipinos who went abroad to work last year were technical, managerial or clerical workers, according to official data.

The government has been seeking ways to upgrade salaries and benefits, according to Myrna Asuncion, assistant director of the government’s economic planning department.

“But local salaries can only go up by so much before they start hurting the competitiveness of local industries,” Asuncion told AFP.

“We want to provide employment opportunities in the Philippines but there are some sectors that say salaries are already too high,” she said.

With no solution in sight, business groups hold little hope of keeping the nation’s top talent at home.

“You cannot stop these people from seeking greener pastures,” said Jesus Varela, a committee chairman with the Philippine Chamber of Commerce and Industry.

Midwife Chae Reviso returned to the Philippines after eight years working tax and rent-free in Saudi Arabia because she wanted to live again with her husband.

But barely a year later, the 39-year-old is preparing to leave again because her homeland offered her too few opportunities.

“I felt I owed my husband some time but I cannot afford to build a house on my salary in the Philippines,” Reviso said. (Agence France-Presse)

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KAPIT SA PATALIM

Migration

KAPIT SA PATALIM

No Comments 10 July 2010

By F Sionil Jose

We have come to esteem our overseas workers as heroes and, indeed, they are. According to official statistics, they bring annually $14 billion or even as much as $20 billion. This vast sum sustains the economy; without it, this nation will collapse — its shopping malls will close, the profligate lifestyle of the rich will cease and thousands upon thousands will definitely starve. FULL STORY

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THE PINOYS’ UNIQUE DIASPORA

Migration

THE PINOYS’ UNIQUE DIASPORA

No Comments 14 April 2010

By Joe Rivera

For Filipinos in the global diaspora, displacement came as an aftermath of the hardships brought about by the Second World War and worsening economic and political conditions in the country, particularly from the late 1960s to the present.

During the Marcos dictatorship in the 1970s and 1980s, Filipinos started leaving in droves. The discovery of the usefulness of overseas workers to the local economy prompted the government and the economic elite to encourage sending them abroad to keep the rotten system afloat.

As globalization facilitated the mobility of goods, services, information and ideas, it also engendered the movement of people, which soon became our primary export to the rest of the world. It has been estimated that there are about 11 million Filipinos overseas scattered in every country in the world, or almost 12 percent of the total population of the Philippines. FULL STORY

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OFW ISSUE A MAJOR CHALLENGE FOR NEXT PRESIDENT

Migration

OFW ISSUE A MAJOR CHALLENGE FOR NEXT PRESIDENT

No Comments 22 March 2010

They may have brought home the bacon – $17 billion in 2009 or over 10 times bigger than last year’s expected foreign direct investment – but more than an economic force, overseas Filipino workers (OFWs) have evolved into a social phenomenon that the country’s next president needs to resolve decisively.

The Filipino diaspora has fostered a “culture of migration,” Professor Mary Lou Alcid of the University of the Philippines’ College of Social Work and Community Development said in a campus forum last February. This has resulted, she noted, in “transnational Filipino families” with the father in Saudi Arabia, the mother in Hong Kong, the daughter in Taiwan, the brother in Dubai, and the youngest left in the Philippines.

In the May elections, migration experts believe that voters should pick a candidate who can resolve the problem of large-scale labor deployment abroad which results in the break-up of families, abuse of OFWs, the spread of infectious diseases, and other ills.

However, about a month before the polls, migrant groups say no candidate has come up with specific strategies to address these problems. FULL STORY.

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15 YEARS AFTER CONTEMPLACION, OFWS STILL GRAPPLING WITH SAME ISSUES

Migration

15 YEARS AFTER CONTEMPLACION, OFWS STILL GRAPPLING WITH SAME ISSUES

2 Comments 17 March 2010

On the 15th death anniversary of Flor Contemplacion, repatriated overseas Filipino workers (OFW) marched to historic Mendiola in Manila to call for an end to government policies which they said continue to undermine migrant workers’ rights and welfare.

Garry Martinez, chair of the migrants’ rights group Migrante International, said that 15 years after the nation was galvanized into protest by the unjust hanging of Contemplacion in Singapore, the plight of OFWs has turned for the worse. “Appalling stories of abuse in foreign lands and the government’s neglectful response” have become everyday stories, he added. FULL STORY.

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